Issues

There are many challenges facing the healthcare industry but few are simple and able to be addressed in a straight-forward manner.

The fact of increasing demand for health care is driven by an aging population requiring more care, a more knowledgeable consumer expecting higher quality care and exercising their right of choice, and the health care reform movement transitioning to a values-based, demand driven model.

The USDOL finds that the changing demographics in the population will have far-reaching effects on the labor force, the economy, and employment over the 2016–26 decade. The overall labor force participation rate is projected to decline as older workers leave the labor force, constraining economic growth. The aging baby-boomer segment of the population will drive demand for healthcare services and related occupations.

But the doctors, nurses, and support staff are also aging resulting in a loss of experiential knowledge and skills that took years to acquire.

DOL: Healthcare and related occupations account for 16 of the 30 fastest growing occupations from 2016 to 2026[1].  Among the top 10 are:

  • Home Health Aides - #3
  • Personal Care Aides - #4
  • Physician Assistants - #5
  • Nurse Practitioners - #6
  • Physical Therapy Assistants - #9

FL Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics (2017)

FL: Healthcare and related occupations account for 17 or the 30 fastest growing occupations from 2017 to 2025. Among the top 10 are:

  • Nurse Practitioners - #1
  • Physician Assistants - #2
  • Physical Therapist Assistants - #3
  • Home Health Aides - #4
  • Physical Therapists - #8
  • Medical Assistants - #10

DOL: 4 of the 10 occupations with the highest projected growth (most new jobs) 2016 to 2026 are healthcare[2]:

  • Personal Care Aides - #1 adding 736,000 jobs
  • Registered Nurses - #3 adding 438,100 jobs
  • Home Health Aides - #4 adding 431,200 jobs
  • Medical Assistants - #9 adding 183,900 jobs

FL: 3 of the 15 occupations gaining the most new jobs 2017-2015:

  • Registered Nurses - #4 adding 30,306
  • Nursing Assistants - #7 adding 17,626
  • Medical Assistants - #15 adding 13,099

DOL:  8 of the top 10 occupations that typically require a master’s doctoral, or professional degree creating the most new jobs are in healthcare:

  • Physical Therapists - #1 adding 67,100 jobs
  • Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary – #3 adding 60,600 jobs
  • Nurse Practitioners - #4 adding 56,100 jobs
  • Physicians and Surgeons, all other - #5 adding 42,300 jobs
  • Physician Assistants - #6 adding 39,600 jobs
  • Mental Health Counselors - #8 adding 36,500 jobs
  • Healthcare Social Workers - #9 adding 35,400 jobs
  • Occupational Therapists - #10 adding 31,000 jobs

DOL:  Registered Nurses

  • #1: lead the bachelor’s degree occupations creating the most new jobs 2016 to 2026 at #1 creating 438,100 jobs.
  • #2 among bachelor’s degree occupations with the most openings 2016 to 2026 with 203,700 jobs.

FL: Top occupations in healthcare for education and training levels 2016- to 2024

  • Master’s or Higher
    • Nurse Practitioners – adding 2,815
    • Physical Therapist – adding 2,796
    • Family & General Practitioners – adding 1,446
  • Bachelor’s Degree
    • Medical & Health Services Managers – adding 1,470
  • Associate Degree
    • Registered Nurse – adding 25,091
    • Dental Hygienists – adding 1,824
  • Postsecondary Vocational
    • Medical Assistants – adding 11,228
    • Nursing Assistants – adding 5,488
    • Home Health Aides – adding 4,828
    • Licensed Practical Nurses – adding 4,222
    • Medical Secretaries – adding 3,401
    • Dental Assistants – adding 2,952
    • Radiologic Technologists – adding 1,659
    • Phlebotomists – adding 1,440
STRATEGIES

Great Healthcare Workforce Strategies Require:

  • Identifying supply, demand and education distribution trends
  • Directing and informing policies to alleviate shortages
  • Ascertaining the cost-effectiveness of staffing
  • Identifying emerging and evolving roles and occupations
  • Identifying new models of healthcare delivery
  • Analyzing the effect of workforce supply on population health outcomes
  • Estimating changes in supply needed to meet the demands of new forms of healthcare delivery
  • Providing statewide and regional forecasts and perspectives